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We’ve Got Your Mortgage Covered

We want to help you ease into things, at the end of your build, we will pay your mortgage repayments for three months*

Go ahead with a First Floor Addition and for a limited time only, we will cover your mortgage repayments, terms apply*

*Terms and Conditions: Cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer. Upon payment of Practical Completion we will pay $500 (no more, no less) each week to the owner for a period of twelve weeks into a nominated bank account. $500/week mortgage repayment has been calculated based upon average mortgage repayments in Australia as at Aug 2021.

 

Construction work can restart on Saturday 31 July – NSW

The NSW Premier has confirmed today (28 July 2021) that the lockdown for Greater Sydney will be extended for four more weeks, to end on 28 August. Despite this extension of time, the Premier has also announced that some types of building work can recommence on 31 July.

Under the new restrictions, work can recommence on home building sites and home renovations in local government areas not listed as restricted local government.

Which home building sites can reopen?

Home building sites and renovation sites in Greater Sydney may reopen from Saturday 31 July except for sites within the eight restricted local government areas.

Building sites that can reopen will also be allowed to start preparatory work tomorrow, 29 July to prepare for work starting on 31 July.

The eight restricted local government areas are Fairfield, Blacktown, Cumberland, Campbelltown, Canterbury-Bankstown, Liverpool, Parramatta and Georges River.

Building sites permitted to be open will need to meet new strict health and safety requirements and have a COVID Safety Plan in place.

Limits on the number of workers allowed on a site will apply based on whether the building site is unoccupied or occupied.

What are the restrictions for home building and renovation work on unoccupied sites?

  • Only one trade team may be on-site at any given time, for example, bricklayers and carpenters cannot be on-site at the same time.
  • Trades may only attend a maximum of five different sites per week.
  • These limits are not applicable to certain specialist roles that are on-site for relatively short periods of time such as site supervisors, certifiers and professional services, engineers, surveyors, delivery drivers and specialist installers working on their own.

What are the restrictions for home building and renovation work on occupied sites?

  • Workers must remain separated from all residents when on-site.
  • Only one trade team may be on-site at any given time.
  • For internal areas a maximum of two workers are permitted at any given time and for external work a maximum of five workers may be on-site at any given time.
  • Trades may only visit a maximum of five different sites per week.
  • These limits are not applicable to certain specialist roles that are on-site for relatively short periods of time, such as site supervisors, certifiers and professional services, engineers, surveyors, delivery drivers and specialist installers working on their own.

What additional restrictions apply for permitted home building and renovation work?

All worksites must have an updated COVID Safety Plan in place.

Masks must be worn at all times, both indoors and outdoors, subject to exemptions.

Builders must appoint a COVID marshal, such as the site supervisor, to ensure all restrictions are complied with on-site. One marshal is required per 50 staff/tradespeople.

Workers must adhere to the 1 person per 4 metre rule (where ever possible).

Deliveries to site must be contactless as far as is practical and workers must maintain a 3 metre separation from anyone not in their team, including delivery personnel.

Builders must maintain a register of all people who have been at their sites and ensure all people, including delivery drivers, ‘check in’ using the Service NSW COVID Safe Check-in QR code.

Can home building continue in the eight restricted LGAs?

No. Building sites within the eight restricted LGAs must remain closed at this time and trades and workers who live within those LGAs are not permitted to leave their LGA to undertake building work.

As has been the case for the last two weeks, urgent works can continue to be undertaken after 31 July in the restricted LGAs.

Can engineers, certifiers and other professionals still carry out inspections?

Yes. The restrictions do not apply to roles that involve inherently short and contactless visits to sites, such as supervisors, certifiers and professional services such as engineers and surveyors.

All people carrying out these roles are still required to wear masks, maintain a 3 metre separation from any other workers on-site (wherever possible) and ‘check in’ to the site using the Service NSW Check-in QR code.

Want more information?

More details on today’s announcements are available on the NSW Government COVID-19 website.

How to Decide Whether to Move Out or Live Through a First Floor Addition, Ground Floor Extension or Renovation?

Whether you are building a First Floor Addition, Ground Floor Extension or Renovation, the one question that our clients always ask us is can they stay in the home and live through construction or should they consider temporarily moving out? This is a big decision to make — with a lot of factors to consider other than your budget when entering into significant construction works to your home.

We have outlined below some of the factors to take into account when looking to stay or move.

Factor # 1 – Scope of works

How much work is going to be done to your home? Are you doing a large scale renovation, ground floor extension or first floor additionAre you renovating the kitchen and bathroom? These are two areas of your home that you often cannot live without for more than a few days. Is there going to be demolition? Are you renovating a completely isolated part of the house (e.g. second floor)? Can you live under the addition while being built?

These are the questions to consider when deciding whether to remain living in your home or move out and allow the builders to work their magic.

Keep in mind that construction is disruptive in nature. It can cause inconveniences and interrupt your daily routine. It is also possible that you will interfere with the builders and slow things down.

Therefore, if you are:

  • Conducting a large scale renovation (50% of the house)
  • Doing ground floor renovations including areas like the kitchen
  • Doing a demolition
  • Removing toxic materials (e.g. asbestos and mould growth)
  • Removing and replacing the roof
  • Doing a total kitchen and bathroom overhaul

You should consider moving out to make way for the builders who will work on your home.

Factor # 2 – Budget

Can you stretch your budget to be able to afford temporary accommodation?

Budget is often a major concern for many renovators or addition and extension builders. The truth is that both moving out and staying in will incur additional expenses.

If you are planning to move out, you must prepare for the costs of short-term renting.

To save money, you could stay in an Airbnb, or a cheaper hotel/motel, go on a budget vacation, or you could ask a friend or a relative if you can stay and live with them temporarily.

If you choose to stay amidst a large-scale renovation, ground floor extension or first floor addition be prepared to order takeaway and bottled drinking water. All these are going to add up to your expenses.

 

Factor # 3 – Basic cooking facilities and a working bathroom

If you choose to live through the large-scale renovation, ground floor extension or first floor addition, you might need to set up a makeshift kitchen and a temporary dishwashing area. Cooking using your outdoor kitchen or BBQ is a great idea.

In general, a makeshift kitchen almost works for most builds, but it is going to be a huge adjustment for everyone with them. You should be prepared to be without a full working kitchen for a least 6 weeks.

Living through a large scale renovation, ground floor extension or first floor addition is also easier when you already have two bathrooms in the house, and one remains functional while the other is being renovated. Otherwise, you need to buy a portable toilet. If you are renovating both as part of your build, be prepared to pay more if you request for them to be renovated separately instead of at the same time as the builder will incur additional travel, labour, time and site costs.

Access to water is crucial too. If you’re staying, ask your builder about the times that they need to turn off the water supply so you can create a bathroom schedule and store clean water for cooking and doing chores.

 

Factor # 4 – Level of tolerance and patience

Can you deal with the noise coming from jackhammers, electric saws, welding machines, dump trucks, cement mixers, cement cutters, tamping machines, sledgehammers, and drills as early as 7AM and as late as 6PM? 

How about that fine gyprock dust that gets everywhere despite sealing up some parts of the house?

Can you deal with all the waste from the construction and scaffolding around your house?

Would you feel comfortable doing your daily routine with the builders and tradies walking around the house? Do you think they can do more when you’re not around?

There are the clients who can and the clients who can’t handle living through a construction zone! Which one are you? Based on experience, a lot of people commencing a large scale renovation, ground floor extension or first floor addition decide to move out in the middle of construction because they cannot bear the noise, dirt, and lack of privacy. Not having to live through the mess and chaos is a lifesaver, especially during these stressful times. You may also find you will be more excited with your new space when you move back in rather than living through the chaos to get to the end.

 

Factor # 5 – Length of the renovation

When the large scale renovation, ground floor extension or first floor addition takes over your home for weeks or months, moving out is the ideal option. The builders work faster with you out of the way, which results in quicker turnaround times and more money saved on labour costs.

 

Factor # 6 – Who are you living with?

 

Most couples with no children decide to live through the renovation process, but only when smaller-scale work needs to be done.

But, if you are doing major building works and you have small children, teenagers, pets, and are living with elderly members of your family, consider moving out. It would help if you got out of the way so the builders would be able to get more done quickly.

 

Factor # 7 – Which is more stressful? Moving out or staying in?

Whether you stay or move, your large scale renovation, ground floor extension or first floor addition can cause stress. Of course, stress is simply par for the course when building, and nearly everyone — regardless of whether they moved out or stayed put – experience some sort of challenge during the build.

Deciding to live through a large scale renovation, ground floor extension or first floor addition or to move out is a personal decision. It is up to you and your family to weigh up the pros and cons, depending on your situation. Assess the amount of work to be done and the time the builders need to finish construction. Once you know the scope of the project and the specifics of the construction and design, you’ll figure out where you will stay while the work is being done.

The most important thing is communication – confirm your selections and questions before your build commences and then allow your builder and their team breathing room to get stuck in and complete the project at hand.





Planning and Approval Timeline

Building smart energy efficient and sustainable additions

The demand for green housing is getting bigger by the minute. The HIA GreenSmart program offers up-to-date information on practical, affordable and durable environmental solutions for residential design and construction.

Today there is more demand for builders to create sustainable homes using environmentally responsible housing design ideas, building techniques and products.

A GreenSmart house will:
✔ Improve the water and energy efficiency of the home and reduce energy bills and costs
✔ Create healthier homes for occupants
✔ Provide options to make the home more adaptable for all stages of life
✔ Reduce waste from the building process
✔ Improve site management during construction

Our Builder Alistair has completed the GreenSmart Professional training and is Accredited as a GreenSmart Professional.

Some things that we have been integrating into our first floor additions, ground floor extensions and renovations are:
✔ Improved thermal performance
✔ Passive solar design and natural ventilation
✔ Design and operational issues for water and energy efficiency
✔ Selection of water and energy-efficient appliances
✔ Lighting
✔ Sustainable building products
✔ Design

When planning your build consider asking your builder or planning team these questions:

Have you thought about the orientation of your addition?

What windows and type of glass to use in your build?

What energy efficiency and sustainable products can you use?

When you meet with our builder and work with our drafting team for your project, we will take these important things into consideration for the design and build of your addition or extension.

Contact us today to discuss how we can integrate environmentally sustainable building solutions into your build.

Extension of the HomeBuilder Grant to 31 March 2021

HomeBuilder provides eligible owner-occupiers (including first home buyers) with a grant to build a first-floor addition/ground floor extension/substantially renovate an existing home. HomeBuilder assists the residential construction sector by encouraging the commencement of new home builds and renovations.

On 29 November 2020, the Government announced an extension to the HomeBuilder program to 31 March 2021.

Changes to the HomeBuilder program include:

  • A $15,000 grant for building contracts (new builds and first-floor additions/ground floor extensions/substantial renovations) signed between 1 January 2021 and 31 March 2021, inclusive.
  • An extended deadline for all applications to be submitted, including those applying for the $25,000 grant and the new $15,000 grant. Applications for the new $15,000 grant can now be submitted up until 14 April 2021 (inclusive). This will apply to all eligible contracts signed on or after 4 June 2020.
  • An extension to the construction commencement timeframe from three months to six months for all HomeBuilder applicants. This will apply to all eligible contracts signed on or after 1 January 2021, but will also be backdated and apply to all contracts entered into on or after 4 June 2020.

Other than the above, the existing program criteria applies. That is, the other existing eligibility criteria remains in place and the $25,000 grant will still be made available for eligible contracts signed on or before 31 December 2020. More information can be found here: https://www.32degreesbuilding.com.au/get-a-25000-contribution-towards-your-addition-extension-or-renovation-through-the-homebuilder-program/

To take advantage of the HomeBuilder Program and secure your HomeBuilder Grant, it is important that you start the planning process now.

Contact us now to discuss your first-floor addition, ground floor extension or large scale renovation project.